Saturday, January 25, 2014

Mornin' Coffee :]

Good mornin' to y'all..
From our place to yours!

Joe Higgs added a new photo. Cayce/Reilly School of Massotherapy ·

Joe Higgs's photo.

How to Build Wood Flooring from Wood Pallets Project

How to Build Wood Flooring from Wood Pallets Project

abuildingweshallgo
abuildingweshallgo

A Building We Shall Go website shares how to create inexpensive wood flooring DIY building project from reclaimed wood from free wood pallets.

By using wood taken from dissembling different wood pallets, a person will accumulate a beautiful selection of wood pieces that once assembled will create a patchwork of colors.

Wood pallet boards are coarse, knotty and unrefined but still usable with a little effort of sanding the boards into a smooth finish.

If you have more time than money, and a willingness to put in some back breaking work… this may be a perfect project for you.  Many people with a homesteading spirit will be up to the challenge.

Wood pallets that have a ” HT” stamped on them means they were heat treated not chemically treated.
Most chemically treated pallets are for overseas importing or exporting but the good news is they are only about 10% of wood pallets.

Click here to read to read the tutorial of how to make this project:

http://abuildingweshallgo.blogspot.com/2013/05/the-art-of-pallet-wood-flooring.html

.

Here is a bonus article – Wood Pallet Accent Wall Project

bowerpowerblog.
bowerpowerblog.

Click here to read the tutorial project:

http://www.bowerpowerblog.com/2010/02/nursery-news-accent-wall/

Elder's Meditation of the Day January 25


Elder's Meditation of the Day January 25
"Also ask your heart to purify and cleanse this defect and harmful desire. Ask also the help of the inner father and mother. Every time we eliminate a defect, we build our soul, our inner temple. We ascend. like going up a stairway."
--Willaru Huayata, QUECHUA NATION, PERU
The building blocks to knowledge and wisdom are constructed through the lessons of our character defects if we constructively review our conduct each day, asking where we are resentful, selfish, dishonest, or afraid. Remember, we need to review constructively, not destructively. Destructive review is when we ask, "what's the matter with me anyway." or "how could I be so stupid?" These question lead to morbid reflection or remorse and seriously affect our self esteem. In constructive review we ask, "what will I do next time?" With constructive review we progressively eliminate the defect and replace it with wisdom.
My Creator, allow me to have my defects because through them I gain in knowledge of Your will.

Prayer of Peace

... prayer for peace ...

www.Ya-Native.com

Friday, January 24, 2014

Elder's Meditation of the Day January 24


Elder's Meditation of the Day January 24
"Always listen to what the Elders say."
--Dona Josefa Medrano, HUICHOL, SIERRA MADRE, MEXICO
In school we have been taught to go to the encyclopedia when we need information about certain subjects. From the time we are little, we have a natural tendency to seek out role models. When we need information about living we tend to seek out books about living. These maybe self help books. The world is full of information. For the Native people, we have our Elders. All races have Elders. Our lives will run much smoother when we listen to the Elders. They don't always tell us what we want to hear, but they always tell us what we need to hear. The Elders have the ability to make the truth sweet.
Creator, thank You for the Elders. Help me this day to listen to them.

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Native History: Major Attacks Wrong Indian Village, Doesn’t Care -- Alysa Landry 1/23/14

Pioneer Museum
Maj. Eugene Baker, center, ninth from left leaning on railing, poses with Army officers at Fort Ellis in this 1870 photograph. Lt. Gus Doane is fourth from left.

Native History: Major Attacks Wrong Indian Village, Doesn’t Care

1/23/14
This Date in Native History: On January 23, 1870, U.S. Major Eugene Baker declared he didn’t care that he was attacking the wrong camp of Blackfeet Indians and gave his men orders to strike a peaceful village on the banks of the Marias River in northern Montana.
The incident, known as Baker’s Massacre or the Marias Massacre, was the worst in Montana history. It resulted in the deaths of at least173 people—mostly women, children and elderly men. Only 15 of those killed were men of fighting age, said Walter Fleming, a member of the Kickapoo Tribe in Kansas and head of the Native American Studies Department at Montana State University.
Baker reported that he defeated 120 “vigorous warriors,” Fleming said. “The initial report was that it was a military battle, when in fact it wasn’t. Initially, he was thought to be heroic in his actions.” In reality, however, Baker attacked the wrong camp and slaughtered a village full of people who had been officially recognized as friendly toward white settlers.
Baker Massacre Site (Toole County Blog)
Baker Massacre Site (Toole County Blog)
Tensions between the Blackfeet Confederacy and white settlers had existed for more than 15 years before the massacre, Fleming said. Settlers wanted more access to the land during the gold rush of 1864. They also brought smallpox in 1869, which devastated Native populations.
In August of 1869, a Blackfeet man named Pete Owl Child stole some horses from Malcolm Clarke, an influential rancher and citizen. Clarke, with the help of his son, tracked down Owl Child and beat him in front of his people. In retaliation, Owl Child and some of his allies hunted down Clarke and killed him, then fled north to join a band of rebellious Blackfeet under the leadership of Mountain Chief.
On January 1, 1870, the Army issued warrants for Owl Child’s arrest and demanded that the Blackfeet Agency produce the murderer within two weeks. When the agency failed to do so, Baker was commissioned to go after Owl Child.
When Mountain Chief learned of the pursuit, he abandoned his winter camp. A friendly Blackfeet chief, Heavy Runner, moved in and immediately sent the young men to hunt for buffalo, Fleming said. Without the men, however, Heavy Runner’s camp was left defenseless.
Baker, an alcoholic, discovered Heavy Runner’s camp on January 22. Although a Blackfeet scout warned him that he was about to attack the wrong people, Baker ordered his men to continue.
“He instructed his men to go ahead and open fire,” Fleming said of Baker. “He knew, in fact, that it was the wrong village. He went ahead and engaged anyway.”
Montana Historical Highway Marker records the tragic massacre that took place nearby. (Montana Department of Transportation)
Montana Historical Highway Marker records the tragic massacre that took place nearby. (Montana Department of Transportation)
At daybreak on January 23, Baker’s men fired into the village, set buildings on fire and burned some of the people alive before torching their winter supplies, leaving the survivors without food or shelter in temperatures 43 degrees below zero.
When the first bullets were fired, Heavy Runner ran from his lodge waving papers that certified he was “of good character and friendly to the whites,” Fleming said. He ran toward the soldiers, pleading for them to cease fire and save the women and children.
Heavy Runner’s papers included documents and treaties from the federal government “showing that he was and his people were in harmony with the United States government,” Joe Upham, a descendant of Heavy Runner, said in an oral history recorded by the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada.
Heavy Runner was shot and killed as Baker’s men moved in, Upham said.
“The people were still in bed,” he said. “Some were sick with smallpox. There were just women and old men and kids in the camp. The young men were hunting and (the people) were helpless to do anything.”
Bear Head, a child survivor of the massacre, later wrote that inside the lodges, “men were yelling, terribly frightened women and children screaming—screaming from wounds, from pain as they died. I saw a few men and women escaping from the lodges, shot down as they ran.”
The Crazy Dog Society singing at Baker Massacre Memorial. (Toole County Blog)
The Crazy Dog Society singing at Baker Massacre Memorial. (Toole County Blog)
Fleming called the massacre “the proverbial straw that broke the Blackfeet.”
“They were decimated by smallpox and unable to mount much of a defense,” he said. “After this the reservation system was pretty much instituted. That changed everything.”
Newspapers congratulated Baker for his “toilsome march in an inclement season to chastise our savage robber foes.” News accounts said the Blackfeet were “possessed of every attribute of beastly depravity and ferocity.”
When the public learned the truth of the massacre, the Army and the federal government launched a campaign to cover it up. However, the incident helped change Indian policy forever. After the massacre, President Ulysses S. Grant put Indian reservations under the control of the Interior Department, ending the Army’s jurisdiction over Natives. Instead of Army officers, clergymen were to act as Indian agents.
Baker was court-martialed for drunken behavior, but never faced charges for the massacre. He died at age 48, most likely of liver cirrhosis.

Read more athttp://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/01/23/native-history-major-attacks-wrong-indian-village-doesnt-care-153211

Elder's Meditation of the Day January 23


Elder's Meditation of the Day January 23
"Our true enemies, as well as our true sources of strength, lie within."
--Willaru Huayta, QUECHUA NATION, PERU
A long time ago, the Creator put inside the human being the secrets to the laws of life. We usually know this is true even though we may not know what these laws are. If something goes wrong with our lives, we usually fix the blame on something outside of ourselves. We tend to give up accountability. One way or another we say, "It's not my fault." We need to realize that all permanent and lasting change starts on the inside and works its way out. If it's meant to be, it is up to me.
Oh Great Spirit, let me realize fully that my problems are of my own making. Therefore, so are the solutions.

I am Changing the things I can

Idle No More.

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

10 Reasons you should Drink Lemon Water in the Mornings

10 Reasons you should Drink
Lemon Water in the Mornings



I start out each day with a large glass of room temperature lemon water. Lemons are rich in vitamins and minerals, particularly vitamin C, an antioxidant that boosts the immune system, protects against cardiovascular disease and even has cancer-fighting properties. Incorporating warm water with lemon juice into your diet is an easy way to meet the daily recommended allowance for vitamin C and keep your body functioning smoothly.
According to Ayurvedic philosophy, choices that you make regarding your daily routine either build up resistance to disease or tear it down.

10 Reasons You Should be Drinking Lemon Water Every Morning
1. Boosts your immune system
Lemons are high in vitamin C, which is great for fighting colds. They're high in potassium, which stimulates brain and nerve function. Potassium also helps control blood pressure.
2. Hydrates the lymph system
This cup of goodness helps start the day on a hydrated note, which helps prevent dehydration (obviously) and adrenal fatigue. When your body is dehydrated, or deeply dehydrated (adrenal fatigue) it can't perform all of it's proper functions, which leads to toxic buildup, stress, constipation, and the list goes on. Your adrenals happen to be two small glands that sit on top of your kidneys, and along with your thyroid, create energy. They also secrete important hormones, including aldosterone. Aldosterone is a hormone secreted by your adrenals that regulates water levels and the concentration of minerals, like sodium, in your body, helping you stay hydrated. Your adrenals are also responsible for regulating your stress response. So, the bottom line is that you really don't want to mess with a deep state of dehydration(2)!
3. Enhances Mood
Lemon energizes you and it enhances your mood. The energy a human receives from food comes from the atoms and molecules in your food. A reaction occurs when the positive charged ions from food enter the digestive tract and interact with the negative charged enzymes.
Lemon is one of the few foods that contain more negative charged ions, providing your body with more energy when it enters the digestive tract. The scent of lemon also has mood enhancing and energizing properties. The smell of lemon juice can brighten your mood and help clear your mind. Lemon can also help reduce anxiety and depression.
4. Detoxes the Liver
According to NaturalNews.com, the citric acid in lemons helps maximize enzyme function, which stimulates the liver and aids in detoxification.
5. Aids in Digestion
Not only will this killer combination relive indigestion, it will also help flush you out. It encourages the liver to produce bile which is an acid that required for digestion. Efficient digestion reduces heartburn and constipation.
6. Balances pH
Drink lemon water every day and you'll reduce your body's overall acidity. Lemon is one of the most alkaline foods around. Yes, lemon has citric acid but it does not create acidity in the body once metabolized.
7. Helps with weight loss
Lemons are high in pectin fiber, which helps fight hunger cravings. It also has been shown that people who maintain a more alkaline diet (see #6) lose weight faster.
8. Acts as a gentle, Natural Diuretic
Lemon juice helps flush out unwanted materials because lemons increase the rate of urination in the body. Toxins are, therefore, released at a faster rate which helps keep your urinary tract healthy.
9. Clears skin
The vitamin C component helps decrease wrinkles and blemishes. Lemon water purges toxins from the blood which helps keep skin clear as well. It can actually be applied directly to scars to help reduce their appearance.
10. Freshens breath
Not only this, but it can help relieve tooth pain and gingivitis. The citric acid can erode tooth enamel, so you should monitor this. I admit, I'm slightly worried about it.
Alright I know I said 10 but lemons are so incredible I had to share 2 more reasons to start your day with warm lemon water!
11. Stress Relief
Vitamin C is one of the first things depleted when you subject your mind and body to stress. As mentioned previously, lemons are chock full of vitamin C.
12. Whole Body Health
Lemons and limes are high in potassium. Potassium is an important mineral that works with sodium for smooth electrical transmission in the brain and nervous system. Depression, anxiety, fogginess, and forgetfulness can often be traced to low potassium blood levels. That same nervous system needs potassium to assure steady signals to the heart. So your heart health is improved from the lemon water's potassium(3).
* Don't use bottled lemon juice as it can contain sulphites which a lot of people are allergic to and well, are just plain unhealthy.


Read more: http://www.healthy-holistic-living.com/10-reasons-you-should-drink-lemon-water-in-the-mornings.html#ixzz2r9rLRVus

Elder's Meditation of the Day January 22


Elder's Meditation of the Day January 22
"The first factor in the revolution of consciousness is the mystic death of the ego - the death of negative thinking, negative personalities. We must purify the soul of the inner enemies. Every time a defect manifests - envy, gluttony, anger, lust, whatever - that impulse to the heart. Ask, `Do I really need to invoke this?' And then honor the heart."
--Willaru Huayta, QUECHAU NATION, PERU
Our egos have character defects. These character defects we sometimes act out and they invariably bring results to our lives that we might not want. If we continue to use these character defects, we will continue to have undesirable results in our lives. How do we change ourselves or get rid of a character defects. We can go to the heart and ask a question, make a decision, then honor the heart. For example, say I get angry today. I would go to the heart and ask, would I rather be right or would I rather be happy? How we answer this question can have an enormous impact on how our day goes. Once we decide the answer to this question, we need to honor the heart by saying, "Thank you for the power of changing my thoughts. I choose to be happy and to experience peace of mind."
Great Spirit, today, let me teach only love and learn only love.

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Elder's Meditation of the Day January 21


Elder's Meditation of the Day January 21
"This is the time of awakening to the inner father and the inner mother. Without this we will receive no high initiation; instead we get initiated into darkness. That's because any investigation or revolution without God leads, not to freedom, but to more slavery."
--Willaru Huayta, QUECHAU NATION, PERU
Honor the Father and the Mother. Father stands for wisdom and Mother stands for feelings. Inside each of us is the Father and the Mother. If we do not honor both, we will not grow in balance. To honor both the Father and the Mother helps our masculine and feminine sides grow. The winter season is a good time to focus on this. This is our season of reflection. Honoring both sides allows us to see the Creator is both Father and Mother.
Great Spirit, Father Sky, Mother Earth, guide me today. Let me experience balance.

Monday, January 20, 2014

Elder's Meditation of the Day January 20


Elder's Meditation of the Day January 20
"The most important thing now is to reveal the inner temple of the soul with right thinking and right activity."
--Willaru Huayta, QUECHUA NATION, PERU
The key to growing a strong tree is to have a good system of roots and to feed the roots with good medicine. If we put poison in the root system, it will affect the tree, and it will become obvious to the rest of the forest what is being fed to the roots. This is also true of the human being. We need to feed our roots with right thinking. If our thinking is right, it will become obvious to the rest of the people. We don't need to tell people about ourselves with our mouth because our actions always tell them.
Great Spirit, direct my thinking today. Feed my roots.

Sunday, January 19, 2014

Don't sleep alone....

Equine Cancer Society's photo.

Elder's Meditation of the Day January 19


Elder's Meditation of the Day January 19
"Heal yourself - your physical and spiritual bodies. Regenerate yourself with light, and then help those who have poverty of the soul. Return to the inner spirit, which we have abandoned while looking elsewhere for happiness."
--Willaru Huayta, QUECHUA NATION, PERU
It is difficult to look inside ourselves, especially when we see conflict or confusion. During times of conflict we need to realize that we are talking to ourselves about our thoughts. This conversation is printing in our subconscious and forming our beliefs. During times of conflict we need to ask the spirit to control our self-talk. Only thorough finding that inner place and going there during troubled times will we ever find happiness.
Great Spirit, You are my peace and you dwell within me. Let me look for You within myself.

Cree Tip[i Poles

TIPI POLE's 
Cree Teachings - 

The tops of the poles have many teachings. Each one points in a different direction. We are like those poles. We all need the strength and support of our families and communities, but we accept that we all have different journeys and point in different directions.

The poles also teach us that no matter what version of the Great Spirit we believe in, we still go to the same Creator from those many directions and belief systems; we just have different journeys to get there. And where the poles come out together at the top, it’s like they’re creating a nest. And they also resemble a bird with its wings up when it comes to land, and that’s another teaching: the spirit coming to land, holding its wings up.


OBEDIENCE

Obedience means accepting guidance and wisdom from outside of ourselves, using our ears before our mouth. We learn by listening to traditional stories, by listening to our parents or guardians, our fellow students and our teachers. We learn by their behaviors and reminders, so that we know what is right and what is wrong. 

RESPECT

Respect means giving honor to our Elders and fellow students, to the strangers that come to visit our community, and to all of life. We must honor the basic rights of all others.

HUMILITY

We are not above or below others in the circle of life. We feel humbled when we understand our relationship with Creation. We are so small compared to the majestic expanse of Creation, just a “strand in the web of life.” Understanding this helps us to respect and value life.

HAPPINESS

After the tripod is up, the fourth pole completes your doorway. This fourth pole teaches us happiness. We must show some enthusiasm to encourage others. Our good actions will make our ancestors happy in the next world. This is how we share happiness. 

LOVE

If we are to live in harmony we must accept one another as we are, and accept others who are not in our circle. Love means to be good and kind to one another and to our selves.

FAITH

We must learn to believe and trust others, to believe in a power greater than ourselves, whom we worship and who gives us strength to be a worthy member of the human race. To sustain our spirituality, we need to walk it every day. Not just sometimes, but every day. It’s not just once a week; it’s your life.

KINSHIP

Our family is important to us. This includes our parents, brothers and sisters, who love us and give us roots that tie us to the lifeblood of the earth. It also includes extended family: grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins, and their in-laws and children. They are also our brothers and sisters and give us a sense of belonging to a community.

CLEANLINESS

Today when we talk about cleanliness, most people think hygiene, and that’s very important. But years ago, when old people talked about cleanliness, they meant spiritual cleanliness. When I used to sit with the old Kookums in their tipis, spiritually, they were so powerfully clean. Clean thoughts come from a clean mind and this comes from our spirituality. With a clean mind and sense of peace within we learn not to inflict ills on others. Good health habits also reflect a clean mind.

THANKFULNESS

We learn to give thanks: to always be thankful for the Creator’s bounty, which we are privileged to share with others, and for all the kind things others do for us.

SHARING

We learn to be part of a family and community by helping with the provisions of food and other basic needs. Through the sharing of responsibilities we learn the value of working together and enjoying the fruits of our labor. 

STRENGTH

We are not talking about physical strength, but spiritual strength. That was instilled in us when we were young people through fasting. We must learn to be patient in times of trouble and not to complain but to endure and show understanding. We must accept difficulties and tragedies so that we may give others strength to accept their own difficulties and tragedies.

GOOD CHILD REARING

Children are gifts from the Creator. We are responsible for their wellbeing, spiritually, emotionally, physically, and intellectually, since they are blessed with the gift of representing the continuing circle of life, which we perceive to be the Creator’s will.

HOPE

We must look forward to moving toward good things. We need to have a sense that the seeds we are planting will bear fruit for our children, families and communities.

ULTIMATE PROTECTION

This is the ultimate responsibility to achieve the balance and well being of the body, mind, emotions and spirit for the individual, the family, the community and the nation.

CONTROL FLAPS

The control flaps on a tipi teach that we are all connected by relationship and that we depend on each other. Having respect for and understanding this connection creates and controls harmony and balance in the circle of life. When we don’t know how to use the flaps, it gets all smoky inside the tipi, and you can’t see, which is like life – because if we can’t live in balance, we can’t see clearly where we’re going.

CONCLUSION - POLES

For every time that a pole is added, a rope goes around to bind that pole into place. You have to be there and see it to appreciate that teaching. That rope is a sacred bond, binding all the teachings together until they are all connected.



TIPI POLE's
Cree Teachings -

The tops of the poles have many teachings. Each one points in a different direction. We are like those poles. We all need the strength and support of our families and communities, but we accept that we all have different journeys and point in different directions.

The poles also teach us that no matter what version of the Great Spirit we believe in, we still go to the same Creator from those many directions and belief systems; we just have different journeys to get there. And where the poles come out together at the top, it’s like they’re creating a nest. And they also resemble a bird with its wings up when it comes to land, and that’s another teaching: the spirit coming to land, holding its wings up.


OBEDIENCE

Obedience means accepting guidance and wisdom from outside of ourselves, using our ears before our mouth. We learn by listening to traditional stories, by listening to our parents or guardians, our fellow students and our teachers. We learn by their behaviors and reminders, so that we know what is right and what is wrong.

RESPECT

Respect means giving honor to our Elders and fellow students, to the strangers that come to visit our community, and to all of life. We must honor the basic rights of all others.

HUMILITY

We are not above or below others in the circle of life. We feel humbled when we understand our relationship with Creation. We are so small compared to the majestic expanse of Creation, just a “strand in the web of life.” Understanding this helps us to respect and value life.

HAPPINESS

After the tripod is up, the fourth pole completes your doorway. This fourth pole teaches us happiness. We must show some enthusiasm to encourage others. Our good actions will make our ancestors happy in the next world. This is how we share happiness.

LOVE

If we are to live in harmony we must accept one another as we are, and accept others who are not in our circle. Love means to be good and kind to one another and to our selves.

FAITH

We must learn to believe and trust others, to believe in a power greater than ourselves, whom we worship and who gives us strength to be a worthy member of the human race. To sustain our spirituality, we need to walk it every day. Not just sometimes, but every day. It’s not just once a week; it’s your life.

KINSHIP

Our family is important to us. This includes our parents, brothers and sisters, who love us and give us roots that tie us to the lifeblood of the earth. It also includes extended family: grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins, and their in-laws and children. They are also our brothers and sisters and give us a sense of belonging to a community.

CLEANLINESS

Today when we talk about cleanliness, most people think hygiene, and that’s very important. But years ago, when old people talked about cleanliness, they meant spiritual cleanliness. When I used to sit with the old Kookums in their tipis, spiritually, they were so powerfully clean. Clean thoughts come from a clean mind and this comes from our spirituality. With a clean mind and sense of peace within we learn not to inflict ills on others. Good health habits also reflect a clean mind.

THANKFULNESS

We learn to give thanks: to always be thankful for the Creator’s bounty, which we are privileged to share with others, and for all the kind things others do for us.

SHARING

We learn to be part of a family and community by helping with the provisions of food and other basic needs. Through the sharing of responsibilities we learn the value of working together and enjoying the fruits of our labor.

STRENGTH

We are not talking about physical strength, but spiritual strength. That was instilled in us when we were young people through fasting. We must learn to be patient in times of trouble and not to complain but to endure and show understanding. We must accept difficulties and tragedies so that we may give others strength to accept their own difficulties and tragedies.

GOOD CHILD REARING

Children are gifts from the Creator. We are responsible for their wellbeing, spiritually, emotionally, physically, and intellectually, since they are blessed with the gift of representing the continuing circle of life, which we perceive to be the Creator’s will.

HOPE

We must look forward to moving toward good things. We need to have a sense that the seeds we are planting will bear fruit for our children, families and communities.

ULTIMATE PROTECTION

This is the ultimate responsibility to achieve the balance and well being of the body, mind, emotions and spirit for the individual, the family, the community and the nation.

CONTROL FLAPS

The control flaps on a tipi teach that we are all connected by relationship and that we depend on each other. Having respect for and understanding this connection creates and controls harmony and balance in the circle of life. When we don’t know how to use the flaps, it gets all smoky inside the tipi, and you can’t see, which is like life – because if we can’t live in balance, we can’t see clearly where we’re going.

CONCLUSION - POLES

For every time that a pole is added, a rope goes around to bind that pole into place. You have to be there and see it to appreciate that teaching. That rope is a sacred bond, binding all the teachings together until they are all connected.