Saturday, April 26, 2014

Elder's Meditation of the Day April 26


Elder's Meditation of the Day April 26
"If those bad words come, I let them come in one ear and go out the other. I never let them come out of my mouth. If a bad word comes in your ear and then comes out of your mouth, it will go someplace and hurt somebody. If I did that, that hurt would come back twice as hard on me."
--Wallace Black Elk, LAKOTA
What do we do with temptations when they come? What do we do when we hear gossip? What do we do when we hear bad things? If we hear these things and pass them on we will not only hurt the other person, but we will do harm to ourselves. We must be careful not to hurt others. Whatever we sow we will simultaneously reap for ourselves. We must be accountable for our own actions.
Great Spirit, today, let no words come from my lips that would hurt another.

Black Elk

Friday, April 25, 2014

Elder's Meditation of the Day April 25

 

Elder's Meditation of the Day April 25
"In some mysterious and wonderful way you are part of everything, Nephew. And in that same mysterious and wonderful way, everything is a part of you."
--Nippawanock, ARAPAHOE
In order to experience this, we must be aware of how limited our senses are � eyes, ears touch, smell, taste. These senses help us to function in the Seen World. What we see is interpreted by our minds and put inside our belief system, and this can become our reality. But there also exists an Unseen World. In this world we experience connectedness; we experience the mystery; and we experience another whole point of view. If we pay attention to both the Unseen World and the Seen World, our belief systems will print in our mind a new and wonderful reality. We will see and know we are a part of everything.
Great Spirit, today, give me the knowledge to know this mystery.


Thursday, April 24, 2014

Marlon Brando handed back 40 acres-- Published on Jan 18, 2014

"When they laid down their arms, we murdered them. We lied to them. We cheated them out of their lands. We starved them into signing fraudulent agreements that we called treaties which we never kept. We turned them into beggars on a continent that gave life for as long as life can remember. And by any interpretation of history, however twisted, we did not do right. We were not lawful nor were we just in what we did. For them, we do not have to restore these people, we do not have to live up to some agreements, because it is given to us by virtue of our power to attack the rights of others, to take their property, to take their lives when they are trying to defend their land and liberty, and to make their virtues a crime and our own vices virtues."
--Marlon Brando


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    Marlon Brando handed back 40 acres of land to American Indians, Dec. 31, 1974

Published on Jan 18, 2014
Marlon Brando, right, center, takes the first steps to hand over his lands to American Indians, Dec. 31, 1974, during a ceremony in Agoura, Calif. Others are Semu Huaurte, medicine man of the 23-tribe Redwind Association. In between Huaurte and Brando is Sen. John Tunney (D-Calif.). Brando apologized for being "400 years too late" in giving the property, about 40 acres.

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Brando we want to remember, especially now, is the actor who pulled back in the 1960s to focus on supporting the Civil Rights Movement and the broader struggles against war and oppression.

Marlon Brando is a cultural icon whose popularity has endured for over six decades. His rise to national attention in the 1950s had a profound effect on the motion picture industry and influenced the broader scope of American culture.

Marlon Brando's childhood was not happy. His parents drank too much alcohol and argued often. Dorothy Brando blamed her husband for the failure of her acting career. The older Marlon Brando did not have a good relationship with his son. In a book about his life, the actor wrote that his father never had anything good to say about his son.

Marlon Brando moved to New York City when he was nineteen years old in 1943. He took acting classes at the New School for Social Research.

In 1946, Brando showed his dedication to the battle against racial segregation in the United States.

Brando's participation in the Black American civil rights movement actually began well before King's death. In the early 1960s, he contributed thousands of dollars to both the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (S.C.L.C.) and to a scholarship fund established for the children of slain Mississippi N.A.A.C.P. leader Medgar Evers.

By this time, Brando was already involved in films that carried messages about human rights: Sayonara, which addressed interracial romance, and The Ugly American, depicting the conduct of US officials abroad and its deleterious effect on the citizens of foreign countries.

In August 1963, he participated in the March on Washington arm in arm with James Baldwin along with fellow celebrities Harry Belafonte, James Garner, Charlton Heston, Burt Lancaster, and Sidney Poitier.

Brando also, along with Paul Newman, participated in the freedom rides, went down South with the freedom riders to desegregate inter-State bus lines.

In defiance of state law, American Indians protested the denial of treaty rights by fishing the Puyallup River on March 2, 1964.

Inspired by the civil rights movement sit-ins, Brando, Episcopal clergyman John Yaryan from San Francisco, and Puyallup tribal leader Bob Satiacum caught salmon in the Puyallup without state permits. The action was called a fish-in and resulted in Brando's arrest.

"When they laid down their arms, we murdered them. We lied to them. We cheated them out of their lands. We starved them into signing fraudulent agreements that we called treaties which we never kept. We turned them into beggars on a continent that gave life for as long as life can remember. And by any interpretation of history, however twisted, we did not do right. We were not lawful nor were we just in what we did. For them, we do not have to restore these people, we do not have to live up to some agreements, because it is given to us by virtue of our power to attack the rights of others, to take their property, to take their lives when they are trying to defend their land and liberty, and to make their virtues a crime and our own vices virtues."

It is tragic that we live in a world where most people's talents never get to see the light of day. It is equally tragic that those like Brando who actually get the opportunity to spread their creative wings, can be consumed and yanked apart in process. Yet whether Brando was on the top of Hollywood or alone and embittered, he never forgot what side he was on.

Elder's Meditation of the Day April 24


Elder's Meditation of the Day April 24
"Each person's prayers can help everyone."
--Thomas Yellowtail, CROW
Prayer is our entrance into the Unseen World. It is by prayer we can call upon the powers and laws of the Great Spirit. The Spirit World has powers and laws that are different from the Physical World. The spiritual laws allow healing to take place; they allow forgiveness to occur; they cause miracles to happen; they cause hate to disappear; they heal broken relationships; they guide every moment of our lives; they allow us to love even when it's hard. Prayer allows us access to the Spirit World.
Creator, teach me to pray.

Russell Means--Before Aim...

Monday, April 21, 2014

Apache Blessing

Elder's Meditation of the Day April 21


Elder's Meditation of the Day April 21
"Conciliation is the key to survival. Peace is the goal."
--Haida Gwaii, Traditional Circle of Elders
When we make decisions or experience conflict we need to look at the greater whole. The end result we want to accomplish is peace of mind. If we keep this goal in mind, we will, overall, live a happy and fulfilling life. Everything in the world is constantly changing so we should not resist this change. A good question to ask ourselves is, "would I rather be right or happy?". If we would rather be happy, then it is easier to let the little things go. If we would rather be right, we tend to look for the WIN/LOSE.
Great Spirit, today, give me the tools to seek peace of mind.

The Older I get....

Sunday, April 20, 2014

learning


Ok, let's see what happens....

Little Horse Park
"Trail Miles Create More Smiles"
With wagons, Life keeps rolling alone.

Lakota Blessing

Lonny Cloud /Thunder Puppy Art

Mabel Strickland, A Cowgirl For All Seasons

Mabel Strickland, A Cowgirl For All Seasons





Photo courtesy Linne Mackinzie
Mabel Strickland may have frowned upon the idea of her own daughter growing up to follow the rodeo circuit, but that didn't prevent her from being one of the best rodeo and wild west show cowgirls of all times.
 She appeared on the cover of the 1926 Cheyenne Frontier Days program in a photo featuring her as a bronc rider, smiling and waving to the crowd while atop the wild one, Stranger. 
In later years she would, along with Bonnie Gray and Bertha Blancett, found the Association of Film Equestriennes. In Rhythm Of The Range, starring Bing Crosby, Mabel did all the trick riding for Crosby who proved to be a better singer than cowboy.
The story below recounts a time when many feared she may die from injuries sustained at the famed Madison Square Garden.
Rodeo cowgirl, rodeo queen, movie queen, Mabel Strickland was the whole package. The most photographed of all the early cowgirls, Mabel was equally at home in the rodeo arena as she was on the silver screen.After winning title for the World Champion Lady Rider at the Cheyenne Frontier Days, she went on to perform in the World Series Rodeo at Madison Square Garden in New York and competed in the trick riding event with a dozen other cowboys and cowgirls. Mabel was performing a trick in which she goes under the horse's neck and grabs the saddle on the other side as the horse gallops around the arena. Somehow, she lost her grip and fell beneath the belly of the galloping horse. She was injured quite severely and newspapers reported her as "near death".
She did recover and went on to win several more championships.
Years later, Mabel established herself as a sought after movie actress and stunt woman in Hollywood. In 1936 she signed for a supporting role in the film, "Rhythm On The Range" with Bing Crosby. A set was duplicated to look like the arena at Madison Square Garden where she had been so badly injured in 1926. As Mabel walked out to the set, she fainted in front of a gate that looked just like the one where she was trampled. She was rushed to the hospital where physicians reported a hemorrhage had reapeared at the site of the old internal wound! She recovered once again and finished the movie on schedule.


Nan J. Aspinwall, Western Entertainer

Nan J. Aspinwall, Western Entertainer

"Nan Jane Aspinwall has successfully completed a ride on horseback from San Francisco to New York," said the Commoner (Lincoln), on July 28, 1911, in a brief paragraph noting this unusual accomplishment. "She arrived in New York in good shape and with the horse in fine condition, on July 8. . . . Since her arrival she has been very busy reading hundreds of letters congratulating her on her feat, and she is followed by crowds in the street wherever she goes."

Aspinwall's ride across the continent in 1911 was perhaps the highlight of a long and colorful career as an oriental dancer, sharpshooter, trick roping expert, and vaudeville actress. Born in New York on February 2, 1880, she spent most of her early years in Nebraska, where her parents were storekeepers in Liberty, a small Gage County town. Later publicity during her career indicated that she was raised on a cattle ranch in Montana, though it seems probable that this story was concocted to enhance her stage image as a cowgirl and Western entertainer.
By 1899 Nan was performing as an oriental dancer, "Princess Omene." Sometime in 1905 or 1906, she began appearing as the "Montana Girl," an expert horsewoman, roper, and sharpshooter, and by 1906 she was billed (along with husband Frank Gable) as a "Lariat Expert." The couple performed with the combined Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Pawnee Bill's Far East Troupe. On a bet from Buffalo Bill, she rode on horseback from San Francisco to New York and back in 1911, supporting herself with exhibitions of roping and riding in small towns along the way. Later she and Frank had their own vaudeville show.
In June of 1927 Nan and Frank Gable were in Norfolk, Nebraska, to attend a much-publicized reunion of old frontiersmen. The gathering, highlighted by a parade, was largely instigated by Norfolk's Dr. Richard J. "Diamond Dick" Tanner and radio personality Karl Stefan. Stefan persuaded more than 300 delegates at the National Editorial Association convention in Omaha to stop in Norfolk while on a tour to the Black Hills, guaranteeing a crowd for a parade and other activities connected with the reunion. TheNorfolk Daily News on June 15, 1927, announced the arrival in town of "Two-Gun Nan" and her husband, identified as "Two Famous Ropers," to participate in the celebration.
"Two-Gun Nan" was billed by the News as the "five times medal winner of world's champion contests for women in vigorous arts of roping, riding and shooting." She had reportedly performed "with a wild west show owned by Dr. Richard Tanner (Diamond Dick) when she was a youngster, and had not seen the Norfolk doctor since 1897."
Little is known of Nan's life after Frank Gable died in 1929 and their show ended. She married again at some point in the 1930s, to Al Lambell, who also predeceased her. She died on October 24, 1964, in San Bernardino, California, after decades of obscurity. Photographs and souvenirs of Nan Aspinwall's career as an oriental dancer, sharpshooter, and vaudeville actress fill six scrapbooks in the collections of the Nebraska State Historical Society.

Elder's Meditation of the Day April 20


Elder's Meditation of the Day April 20
"You must be prepared and know the reason why you dance."
--Thomas Yellowtail, CROW
Inside every human being is a need to dance. We dance to music. Have you even wondered why people are moved when they hear an Indian Drum? The drum is the heartbeat of the Mother Earth. Every Indian dance is for a purpose and a reason. Every Song is for a reason. The beat of the drum makes our bodies, minds, and spirits join together in harmony. It allows us to connect to Mother Earth and to each other. The dance aligns our minds to think spiritual thoughts. Dancing to the drum is healthy.
Great Spirit, today, I dance to honor you.

I've seen better days....